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Paternity 2018-04-07T02:44:45+00:00

Lawyers for Paternity Issues in New Jersey

When a child is born to unmarried parents and the purported father does not voluntarily claim paternity, it may be necessary for a New Jersey court to determine paternity of the child for the purposes of child support, custody, and parenting time. Paternity cases involve a number of issues and can be complex. That is why our paternity lawyers in New Jersey are here to help you.

Establishing Paternity in New Jersey

According to New Jersey’s paternity statute, a man is presumed to be the biological father of a child if:

(1) He and the child’s biological mother are or have been married to each other and the child is born during the marriage, or within 300 days after the marriage is terminated by death, annulment or divorce;

(2) Before the child’s birth, he and the child’s biological mother have attempted to marry each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with law, although the attempted marriage is or could be declared invalid, and:

(a) if the attempted marriage could be declared invalid only by a court, the child is born during the attempted marriage, or within 300 days after its termination by death, annulment or divorce; or

(b) if the attempted marriage is invalid without a court order, the child is born within 300 days after the termination of cohabitation;

(3) After the child’s birth, he and the child’s biological mother have married, or attempted to marry, each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with law, although the attempted marriage is or could be declared invalid, and:

(a) he has acknowledged his paternity of the child in writing filed with the local registrar of vital statistics;

(b) he has sought to have his name placed on the child’s birth certificate as the child’s father . . . ; or

(c) he openly holds out the child as his natural child; or

(d) he is obligated to support the child under a written voluntary agreement or court order;

(4) While the child is under the age of majority, he receives the child into his home and openly holds out the child as his natural child;

(5) While the child is under the age of majority, he provides support for the child and openly holds out the child as his natural child; or

(6) He acknowledges his paternity of the child in a writing filed with the local registrar of vital statistics, which shall promptly inform the mother of the filing of the acknowledgment, and she does not dispute the acknowledgment within a reasonable time after being informed thereof, in a writing filed with the local registrar. . . .

Get Help with Paternity Issues Today

Our attorneys understand that family law disputes and paternity matters are especially sensitive issues. We are experienced in guiding clients through the complicated legal issues of establishing paternity. If you are looking for assistance with establishing paternity, call The Law Office of Rachel S. Cotrino, LLC at 732-987-9966 today.